How To Be Irrelevant

Have you ever thought to yourself, “I wish I could be more aloof and unapproachable as a Christian”? Have you ever wondered how you might make your faith more disconnected from reality? Have you ever longed to be just plain irrelevant to those around you who are lost and hurting without Christ?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then you’re in luck! It just so happens that I have some simple, practical pieces of advice for you. I believe that if you take these suggestions to heart and implement them in every aspect of your life, you’ll be well on your way to irrelevance in no time!

1. Take personal offense whenever unbelievers sin. If you want to be truly irrelevant, you’ll need to make sure that you express horror and disgust whenever someone in the world acts like you used to before you met Jesus. Even if it’s a minor offense that doesn’t affect you at all, make sure you respond in unbridled outrage, so that others can know just how holy you are. Jesus may have come to seek and save the lost, but it’s your job to condemn and rebuke them.

2. Steer clear of all ungodly influences. Nothing says “I don’t care about unbelievers” quite like a concerted and strategic effort to avoid the things they care about. This is why you need to make sure that you onlyparticipate in Christian organizations and watch Christian movies and read Christian magazines and hang out with Christian friends and shop at Christian businesses and wear Christian t-shirts. Make sure everyone around you understands that your faith isn’t about following Jesus as much as it is about retreating into a well-manicured and meticulously protected Christian subculture.

3. Never let others see your weakness. What could possibly be more humanizing than a Christian who actually admits to struggling with things? This must be avoided at all costs. Irrelevance demands that people see your life as being perfectly sterile and sanitized. If you must share a weakness, at least make sure it sounds spiritual. Perhaps something like, “Occasionally I struggle to stay focused when I have my daily 3-hour devotional time before sunrise.” That will ensure that others see you as some sort of freakishly un-relatable spiritual robot.

4. Don’t talk about Jesus. Here’s the scary truth: the moment you start talking about the one and only source of hope and redemption for this dark and dying world, people will start to get curious. Some of them might even want to hear more. And in the end, you might find that people will actually resonate with a Savior who suffered and died to bring them spiritual life. Before you know it, you’ll lose all sense of irrelevance that you’ve been carefully cultivating. So by all means, talk about morality and politics and social issues you feel strongly about. But be sure to leave Jesus out of the conversation.

In all these things, it’s vital to recognize that relevance doesn’t mean having flashy church programs or watering down the message or wearing skinny jeans when you’re 65 years old. True relevance is about Christians acting like Christ. It’s about caring for people, rubbing shoulders with the lost, being transparent, and pointing others to the gospel.

So if you want to be irrelevant, these are the very things you need to avoid. Don’t focus on matters of style. Instead, simply look at the average, everyday Christians in all walks of life who are faithfully following Jesus and sharing his love with the lost. Study these men and women. Take note of their simple yet bold posture of love. And then go do the opposite. In other words, be as unlike Christ as you possibly can.

If you’re able to do that, I truly believe that you’ll be able to radically transform your life into one that non-Christians will never want to be a part of.

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